makenzie-rush:

Studio MIR blows my mind

 (via equalistmako)

The police crackdown Sunday not only failed to dislodge protesters from a major thoroughfare in the heart of Hong Kong but appeared Monday to have motivated more people to join the student-led protests. A government announcement that the riot police had been withdrawn from the protest centers also seemed to open the door to growing demonstrations. The number of protesters, which had ebbed overnight, swelled again by midday Monday, as office workers in slacks and dress shirts mixed with crowds of students in black T-shirts.

Many of the new arrivals said they were angered by the police’s actions on Sunday, which they called excessive.

“This morning I was happy to see that they stayed and insisted on continuing the protest,” said Cindy Sun, a 30-year-old bank worker who joined protesters in the Admiralty district during her lunch hour.

“What they were doing was not appropriate, especially the tear gas,” she said. “The students were completely peaceful.”

Chloe Wong, 46, a mother of two, said she was inspired to join the protesters in Admiralty by the scenes of tear gas being fired the day before. She said she could find time to participate for only an hour but wanted to show her support.

“The protesters, they are so young,” she said. “They are fighting for our future, for my children’s future.”

Hong Kong Residents Defy Officials’ Call to End Protests - NYTimes.com (via jenn2d2)

yeoja:

i have nightmares about white people walking around in my house with their shoes on

15 hours ago with 5,333 notes via beardedbrowngirl by yeoja
15 hours ago with 28,713 notes via e4rthy by playdontfight

claphne:

child

why u scream

15 hours ago with 386,837 notes via userbar by claphne

darkface:

Wood (by Bartosz Sienkowski)

15 hours ago with 1,121 notes via cafe-latte by flickr.com
15 hours ago with 21,700 notes via amsterdamsemasry by night-birds

When you feel
terrified about
something that
crosses your path,
it means that you’re
going through
a great change.

But to reach
the full potential
of your soul,
you must face
these fears that
paralyze bones
and kill dreams.

face your fears - j.b. (via youshouldacceptchaos)

15 hours ago with 18,954 notes via chunity by Flickr / bassanity

humanrightswatch:

Political Earthquake in Hong Kong

A political earthquake is underway now in Hong Kong. On the streets of Central over the last two days, the tectonic plate of pro-democracy protests has ground up against the plate of police in riot gear, rupturing what had been an uneasy calm in the wake of Beijing making clear its disdain for its treaty promise that Hong Kong would have a “high degree of autonomy.”

Some of the images of large numbers of students, assembled calmly, arguing for the merits of democracy and transparency, expressing fears of corruption and loss of political rights have been eerily reminiscent of Beijing in the spring 1989. But the hope in Hong Kong has been that a very different outcome can be accomplished: quite simply, to allow people in Hong Kong to retain control over most decisions affecting the territory. 

The proximate struggle now is for popular nomination for Hong Kong’s highest position, which Beijing has resisted because democrats and populists critical of the central government have always been among the most popular political figures in Hong Kong. Some protestors are now demanding the immediate resignation of Hong Kong Chief Executive CY Leung; others are sticking with their original demand for reform of the electoral and political systems.

But the jarring photos of police using tear gas and pepper spray on protestors, as well as the fact that Joshua Wong, a 17-year-old democracy supporter, has now been held by police for two days, suggest that authorities’ responses in the coming days and their larger consequences are far from clear. It is uncertain precisely what has been explicitly dictated by Beijing, but it is difficult to imagine mainland authorities giving in to this kind of public pressure.

They may now find themselves wishing they had accepted the prospect of a pro-democracy chief executive in Hong Kong as the lesser of two evils, but now the stakes are that much higher: is Beijing ready to let people across China see that large-scale demonstrations will elicit key political concessions? This seems inconceivable.

The tectonic plates aren’t done shifting yet, and protestors remain on the streets. Much in the longer-term will depend on police exercising restraint in the use of force, and refraining from detaining demonstrators who pose no real threat to public order. But even if that is achieved, the aftershocks are likely to hit—wave on wave, in Hong Kong and the mainland and beyond—for a long time to come. 

Photo: Riot police fire teargas to disperse protesters after thousands demonstrated in the main street to the financial Central district. © 2014 Reuters

“I don’t think people understand how stressful it is to explain what’s going on in your head when you don’t even understand it yourself.”

Sara Quin  (via analyticalmuslim)

15 hours ago with 153,069 notes via afghoon by trnscndnt

muslimerican:

Woman and mosque in Xinjiang Province, China.

[image source]

nomadic-mantra:

If you’ve ever doubted yourself, walk deep into any forest. Notice how the trees still stand even though they are given no recognition. Walk along any stream. The water still flows, though no one stops to praise it. Watch the stars late at night; they shine without acknowledgment. Humans are just the same. We are made out of the same elements as these beautiful wonders. Always remember your beauty and self worth. 

©CP